Posts Tagged 'Inspiration'

Magnolia Bluff – Before & After

Master Bathroom - Before

Master Bathroom - After

Guest Bathroom - Before

Guest Bathroom - After

Design challenge-

Update the 1920’s bathroom decor to compliment the home’s Spanish Colonial style.

Solution-

Modern conveniences merge with Mediterranean sensibility, creating a sense of warmth and luxury.

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Queen Anne 1 – Before & After

Kitchen Challenge: Design a comfortable kitchen for a family of five within an existing narrow maze of circulation.

Kitchen Solution: A functional arrangement of appliances and ample workspace – all found within the existing walls – by simply eliminating one door.

Kitchen, before

Kitchen, after

Dining Room Challenge: Revive the original charm and warmth of this historic Craftsman interior.

Dining Room Solution: The paint was stripped from the original millwork, and the perfect period-appropriate paint color was chosen for the plaster.

Dining Room, before

Dining Room, after

 

Relocating a Japanese Temple

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Dr. David Shaner, chairman of the philosophy department at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina (and also a friend), was entrusted in 2004 with the relocation of the Tsuzuki family’s private Buddhist temple from Japan to the Furman campus.  This is the first known relocation of a temple from Japan to the United States, and it was an incredible undertaking with a strict deadline of completed demolition.  Years of energy and talent were required to raise funds, dismantle, transport, and rebuild the temple – including 13 Japanese craftsmen.

Read more:

Associated Content, “Palace of Peace Buddhist Temple and Asian Gardens Dedication,” Sept. 18, 2008.

Lubbock Online, “Buddhist temple becomes part of university campus, ” Nov. 8, 2008.

Reconstruction is now complete.  These photos, taken during construction, are part of a collection posted here.

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Decorating the early 1900’s home (Part One – Living Rooms and Bedrooms)

Domestic

When it comes to finish materials, where do you go to find out what is truly period-appropriate for your vintage home?

While antique shopping in Oregon last summer, I found a book published in 1917 by an architect named L. Eugene Robinson, titled “Domestic Architecture”. The book was intended for homeowners who were remodeling or building homes at that time, and much of what was written is relevant for restoration or remodeling turn-of-the-century homes today.

Here are some highlights regarding interior finishes for living rooms and bedrooms:

Living Rooms

  • ..should be above all restful.”
  • colors should be dull and neutral
  • Old ivory or cream white enamel of semi-dull finish on the woodwork, oatmeal paper of light brown on the walls, light buff paper on the ceiling, and any good flooring with, perhaps, Oriental rugs…”
  • “…it is not well to slavishly hold to the color and tones of the scheme.  If this is done, the effect will be monotonous, which is not restful.  There should be judicious departures in color, chiefly in the furnishings, and especially in certain architectural features such as fireplaces, floors, and ornamental glass windows.”
  • “As a rule, the gradation of color should be such that the ceiling is light, the frieze less light, the wall and wainscoting darker, and the floor darkest.”
  • “A floor may be of very light wood, while the gradation of color starts dark at the base of the wall.”

Bedrooms

  • “…should have the quality of freshness regardless of the color scheme…”
  • “While women usually prefer white, pink, blue or yellow rooms, men generally prefer brown, grey or green.”
  • Any color scheme that is not disturbing and that does not take on a dingy air may be satisfactorily developed.”
  • Wallpaper… is used almost to the exclusion of other materials…”
  • “On sanitary grounds the painting of bedroom walls is preferable to papering.”
  • Woodworkwhite or cream in color, firstly because it is neat, fresh and easily washed, and secondly because any bedroom set of furniture will conform to it.”
  • “A very handsome treatment for a bedroom is to make the woodwork exactly like the bedroom set, of maple, walnut, mahogany, or any hard wood.”
  • Maple flooring is very satisfactory for bedrooms.”
  • “For inexpensive treatments, white paint may be used on the wood trim, and gray paint on the floorSometimes, matting over a common floor proves very satisfactory.”

(Part Two will cover kitchens, bathrooms, and porches.)

A Lesson from Paris

steps of a Paris church serve as neighborhood park

Steps of a Paris church serve as neighborhood park.

In Paris, modern life and historic treasures coexist in a centuries-old urban fabric. Nearly every building serves more than one use, such as retail below with housing above (often 4+ floors of very elaborate construction). Imagining where and how to live in Paris is easy. The urban fabric sets the perfect stage, with options for food, culture, and shopping on every street.

While visiting this spring, I realized that Paris is a great example of making good use out of every inch. It is a principle of design that holds true no matter the scale, from bungalow to city planning. After all, if there is room for boys to play ball in front of the neighborhood church, there must be room for the television somewhere in your cottage.

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Everything has more than one use.